5 Beauty Products Every Fashionista Has in Her Medicine Cabinet

These five beauty products are must-haves for every woman. This includes the natural woman who decries the use of makeup. These products keep your skin and hair healthy, so their natural beauty will always shine through.

Find Your Best Facial Cleansing Product

Your skin may be oily, dry, or a combination. This is a critical factor in determining the best facial cleansing product. Having adequately hydrated skin is essential to looking and feeling great. It also helps reduce the appearance of aging. After this, you will consider irritants and chemicals.

For generally oily skin, you want something that will remove the extra oil without stripping it all off. If you tend towards dry skin, you need a moisturizer that eliminates impurities and provides additional hydration. Dry skin is also more sensitive, so find a cleanser that is gentle but still cleans well. A creamy or milky cleanser is best.

Next, look for one that has no irritants such as perfume, alcohol, or detergent. You want it to clear away the makeup, dirt, and impurities without removing the natural oils from your skin. Last, if you are concerned about chemicals, find one made from all-natural or organic ingredients.

Moisturizer

You already know your skin type, but do you have acne or sensitive skin? For normal skin, find a light, non-greasy moisturizer. For dry skin, look for a creamier option. This may require you to try different versions. Pay attention to how it feels on your face and check for signs of irritants. Stop using the product immediately if you have any reactions.

A Facial Mask Is A Must

A facial mask made from clay or charcoal is best for thicker skin with a lot of oil. Those with sensitive skin should look for ones with a jelly or biocellulose base. Finally, there are anti-blemish or anti-aging options as well.

Invest in a Good Hair Mask

Do you have oily, dry, or chemically treated hair? Is it dry, frizzy, or curly? How porous is your hair? Low porous hair will repel moisture, and high porous hair will soak it up. Deep conditioning products make fine hair feel oily. For colored treated hair, look for one that will help slow down the color fading process. If needed, look for products that help repair damage caused by chemical or excessive hot air use.

Pimple patch

These are not just for teenagers. Pimple patches absorb excess fluid, suck out dirt or oil, and stick them to the patch. Patches can help you if you touch your pimple, thus reducing irritating and further inflaming it. Also, look for aloe vera or vitamin oil, which will help reduce inflammation as well.

Now that you know how to stock your beauty basics, you are ready to take the world on. Look and feel your best. Add a smile, and you will get noticed everywhere you go.

Meet The Stunner Behind The Cover Of The November 2020 Issue Of Sassy & Co Magazine: The Beautiful Roxette Arisa

Photo Credit: Lasonic Sivongxay

Beauty and fashion expert, wildly successful Japanese American YouTube / Social Media guru Roxette Arisa is making a name for herself in the skincare, beauty, and fashion space with over 75 MILLION views and 1.2 MILLION subs on YouTube alone. Whether she is giving tips on how to perfect your makeup for mask-wearing, providing how-to-tips for taking that lust-worthy passport photo, comparing designer and drugstore brands with a split face tutorial, or giving how-to-style basics by using clothes you already have in your closet, Arisa is a quickly rising star who is highly respected for her expertise in the beauty and fashion world.

Arisa’s rise in the beauty and fashion world is quite different from her contemporaries. Growing up in Culver City, California she always knew from a young age what she wanted to be: an Olympic figure skating medalist. She began skating at the age of 4, training and practicing to perfection. By the age of 15, she moved to Detroit where she was selected for the Jr. National Team as part of a duo ice dancing partnership. Arisa then moved to Canada, where she was being groomed to compete internationally for Canada, and in 2016, at 17 years old, she and her partner placed Silver at sectionals solidifying her stance as a competitor. But soon after, her world was rocked when her partner suddenly retired, and in 2017 she found her dreams of competing in the 2018 Olympics in Pyeong Chang all but a fleeting dream. The reality was that it would be near impossible to find a new skilled partner in time. But Arisa had found another passion.

Since a young age, she had worn makeup for skating competitions and as she got older, she realized that she had found an appreciation for applying and learning new makeup techniques. She often trained in skating for 8+ hours a day, but at night she would spend her time watching makeup tutorials online and she decided to create a YouTube page herself. To her, makeup was something that always gave her confidence and she wanted to share her advice with others. Before long, her following and views began skyrocketing and she realized that when one door closes another one opens. She decided to retire from skating and instead focus on her new passion – the beauty and fashion world. She packed up her bags and moved back home to Los Angeles. Around this time, brands began to take notice. In only a couple of years, Arisa has quickly become a favorite for beauty and fashion brands alike, and has become a beauty ambassador to Smashbox, e.l.f., partnered with brands like Revolve, Olay, Murad, NARS, Maybelline, MAC, Instagram, Clarisonic, Neutrogena, Kate Somerville, CeraVe, IPSY, L’Oreal, Lorac and created her own collections for Milani and SIGMA to name a few.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Arisa to discuss her journey in the industry and here’s what went down:

Can you tell us more about yourself? How did you get started in the industry?

Growing up I was a competitive figure skater for 20 years and was always doing my makeup and hair for competitions to match the competition dresses I would wear. The confidence I felt when I put on a red lip or a smokey eye was a little bit addicting and I just fell in love with the world of beauty which led me to find the beauty community on YouTube and to eventually start a channel of my own. For my first couple of videos, I remember filming on my floor with my laptop webcam and a lamp turned sideways to give me some “light,” which is so funny to look back on. It’s been an amazing journey getting from those lamp and laptop days to now when I’m able to combine my two passions – beauty and fashion – on all of my platforms.

How did you develop an interest in fashion and what drove you to pursue that passion onto social media?

I’ve always loved fashion. I think fashion and beauty go hand in hand. Fashion is a form of self-expression and at the end of the day, I’m an artist – whether that be in makeup or in putting together an outfit in my head that I know is going to make me feel and look bomb. To me, fashion is a feeling – I want to feel confident and I want to inspire my followers to be confident.

What do you like most about being an influencer?

I love being able to connect with people all around the world. It’s such an amazing feeling to meet someone and know that you touched their life in any way possible. I definitely would say I have a special bond with my followers and think of them as my friends and my little online family.

In what way has social media changed your life?

I think at this point social media has really changed the world. I mean it’s the fastest-growing form of advertisement/marketing, it’s a way to connect with anyone and everyone around the world, and it’s a place to share what means the most to you. I know I definitely would not have had half of the experiences and opportunities that I have had without social media. It’s still surreal to me that I have built my career from the ground up by sharing what I’m truly passionate about. I’m forever grateful to my fans and followers because I really would not have the life I have today without their support.

What are some of the difficulties of being in the industry?

I think the biggest difficulty is comparison. It’s so easy to compare yourself to others online but you have to realize that everyone has their own journey and their own path. My dad always says “Everything that is happening to you, is happening at the right place and at the right time for YOU, because that’s just the way it was meant to happen.” That’s something I like to think about when I feel myself falling into that deep hole of comparison.

How does your thought process differ when creating content for Instagram versus content for YouTube?

Instagram and YouTube are totally different platforms. Instagram is all about the aesthetic and when I’m creating content for IG, I’m looking for something that will catch the viewers’ eye while scrolling. On YouTube – I feel like I get to share every part of me. I really get to connect with my followers on YouTube so my content is more laid back and truly a piece of me.

Photo Credit: Lasonic Sivongxay

What are your long-term goals for your social media accounts?

I really do think of my social media accounts as an art form. I want to continue expressing my creativity and growing and learning with my followers. I love photography and cinematography so I would love to expand on those art forms and implement it into my work on social media!

When choosing whether or not to work with a brand that wants to work with you, how do you decide? Which brand sponsorship(s) are you most proud of?

It’s actually really easy for me to decide what brands to work with because I never work with a brand or promote products that I don’t genuinely use. That’s something I’ve always stood by ever since I started making videos. I think of my followers as friends so I would never want to break their trust by promoting a product that doesn’t work for me. I’m super proud of the work I’ve done with Maybelline New York. They are a brand that I have been using since I was a teenager so it’s just so surreal to be able to work with them now. I also did a really cool AR video with MAC Cosmetics where my subscribers could actually try on different shades of lipstick in the video. That was a fun project! Smashbox Cosmetics and Dior Makeup stand out to me as well when I think of projects that I’m super proud of and grateful that I got to be a part of.

If someone is going to make your life into a movie, who would play you?

Miley Cyrus! I love her and everything she stands for. A lot of people say we look alike!

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I have lots of plans and aspirations when it comes to my career, some of which I can’t talk about yet *wink wink*, but one of the things I would love to do is get into more traditional media – super interested in hosting and acting! On a personal level – I’m trying to give my apartment a little makeover right now and finally start decorating it. I’ve only lived here for 3 years – wish me luck!

The ‘LIGHTNING FAST’ Round:

1. Last good movie you’ve seen. How Do You Know? with Reese Witherspoon, Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson

2. What do you consider beautiful and why? I’m a true believer that beauty shines from the inside – that’s what my mom and dad always taught me.

3. What haven’t you done yet that you wish you could? One of my dreams is to go to the South of France!

4. Complete this sentence: “If I had no fear, I’d…” try to recreate Britney Spears’ “I’m A Slave 4 U” performance at the 2001 VMAs! Unfortunately, with my fear of snakes that definitely won’t be happening any time soon.

5. What is the one “flaw” you wouldn’t change about yourself? One of my figure skating coaches once told me I needed to get my ears stapled back because they were too big. I think it’s important to love every part of yourself – this is a journey I’m still on but I think my ears make a nice little setting place for all the gold hoops I wear.

Meet The Woman Behind The Cover Of The September 2020 Issue Of Sassy & Co Magazine: The Amazing Dr. Mahtab Hanna

Dr. Mahtab Hanna is an award-winning British jewellery artist and designer-maker with a Persian heritage, whose designs are radically different from others – the cross-pollinating of Eastern and Western history, culture, religion, character, thoughts, and politics play a large part in the inspiration process leading to her creations. Whether its unique pieces or a limited edition series of work, her quest is to define within those pieces what she is aiming for, what the client is trying to communicate, and the reason behind each design. Some of her specialties include fine and contemporary jewellery, sculpture, and body adornment.

In 2017 Mahtab held a solo exhibition entitled “Political Jewellery: Silent Protest” at the P21 Gallery in London, and she has been featured by The Goldsmiths’ Centre (UK’s leading charity for the professional training of goldsmiths and a community for design, creativity, and craftsmanship), New Designers, Cox & Power, Masterpiece, Gallerie Marzee, amongst others. Mahtab’s trailblazing achievements include being awarded her Doctorate from Central Saint Martins and during those 4 years of her Ph.D., she had two children!

Sassy & Co magazine recently caught up with Mahtab to discuss her journey in the fashion and jewellery industry and here’s what went down:

Could you please tell our readers a brief background about yourself and how you started your business?

I am a British jeweller with a proud Persian background. It all started when I first wore my mother’s jewellery, I became passionate about the small design details on those jewellery; how its made, the precious stones, and how people wore them. It was then that I saw people, their clothes and jewellery as a canvas.

This led me to study jewellery and goldsmithing for over a decade leading to an MA from the Royal College of Art and a Ph.D. from Central Saint Martins in Jewellery.

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I love fashion, its an undeniable ingrained part of the substance of being a woman. Whilst there are so many fashion designers, there aren’t enough female jewellers in my view.

I entered the industry by showcasing my work and being showcased. I expanded from my artistic jewellery lines into fashion jewellery and body adornments, leading to my 2011 catwalk show at The Royal Exchange in London.

What do you like most about being a designer?

Being a designer is about sharing your life, your experiences, your feelings, your journeys, all under the umbrella of new creations. It’s a conversation with people you may never meet but have communicated with. You are influencing their confidence; how they communicate themselves and how people see them. Amazing!

Every designer is an individual, their creations are unique to them, just like their fingerprints. The concept behind my Goldfinger piece was that it would be customised for each individual wearer.

Ultimately, extending the experience of jewellery wearing is to challenge and ambush the boundaries of function and ornamented decorative art, highlighting communication, concluding with stimulating contemplation.

While creating each piece is a process and expression or development of a vision I have, jewellery is created for other people. It is important to remember this without compromising the original vision I have throughout the design and creation process.

The downside to being a fashion designer?

One of the most frustrating issues is that of designs being stolen or copied without the due respect to the original designer or maker. What was thought through in the design has been lost because the item is now simply “a thing,” not a messenger.

Of course, this is not a problem that’s just exclusive to jewellery, but the entire fashion arena.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

There have been many memorable experiences, such as being featured in Vogue Italia, selected as one of the top luxury jewellers in the UK newspaper, The Telegraph, and featured in Qatar Airways magazine. I also appeared in a TV program called Four Rooms where top dealers tried to negotiate to buy some of my pieces.

Perhaps the most memorable was being selected to be the cover for the Goldsmiths’ Company inaugural post-graduate programme and being mentored by the late Dr. Stuart Devlin, one of the jewellery industry’s royalty.

Naturally, there is a lot of satisfaction from seeing my creations being used in films, photoshoots, and publications.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

The word “interesting” applies to every human, in my view. Those that have had a profound effect on me include the renowned British jewellers Shaun Leane and Theo Fennell. Their support for upcoming jewellers is a testament to their commitment to the industry.

Didier and Martine Haspeslagh who have a passion for jewellery made and designed by painters, sculptors, architects, and designers from the late 19th to the end of the 20th century.

Audiences have taught me the array of views on my pieces, clients have taught me the sheer personal nature of jewellery, the industry has taught me the sense of community. Therefore, many people who have interests!

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or yourself.

There’s a lot of politics behind the smiles in any industry, and fashion and jewellery is no exception.

I try to engage in one of the core values I place in life: from every person I meet, I try to leave the conversation having learned something or having exchanged knowledge. This is, in my view, the essence of being a designer – every lesson is valuable and shapes me.

The single most valuable lesson has been to remain faithful to my own values. Always consider the options but trust yourself to take the decisions – leadership starts with you!

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

I have been blessed to have a family that is completely supportive and unflinching in their love throughout my journey, through the victories and the challenges, especially my darling husband, Rafah Hanna.

It is critical for any creative person to have someone to support them, not only during the achievements but also at times of growth and learning. This is the person that will stand by you as you face those that do not have your best interest at heart.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

In the early days, I would want to focus much more on brand growth, especially internationally.

Another thing I would change would be to closely study those that have taken a similar journey leading to success, learning from their experiences.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

My mother often says to me – If you can be inspired, you can definitely inspire.

What are your future plans? What new projects are you currently working on right now?

I am excited to tell you exclusively that I am working on publishing my book related to political jewellery! How jewellery is used as a tool of messaging and communication to affect protests and opinions in the matter of politics.

I will also be having an international exhibition with the same theme related to the book.

My “Pawns” Chess Set is an example of my political jewellery designs, which I also made. It is made from Sterling Silver and Bronze and relates to the most extreme form of protest – war: a highly emotive and evocative subject throughout mankind’s history.

Politics, religion, money, and natural resources are all causes of wars, and these are all represented on the stage within this work in their own way.

The chess board is made from sand and soil, both of which represent another cause of war – “land” – as well as the battlefield.

The ‘LIGHTNING FAST’ Round:

1. Last good movie I’ve seen: Frozen 2 – as my daughter, Anais, and I both love it!

2. What do you consider beautiful and why? Beautiful is such a personal thing – we may share a view of beauty, but it is equally about your values, thoughts, and mood even. I consider beautiful to be yourself, it is to fight for those that cannot fight and stand for equality.

3. What haven’t you done yet that you wish you could? I would like to run workshops whereby I would mentor upcoming jewellers and designers, sharing my experiences with them, helping them to confidently progress in their chosen careers.

4. Complete this sentence: “If I had no fear, I’d… ” I don’t actually recognise the notion of fear. Life and careers are a series of challenges, fear is certainly one of them. It’s your job to face them, analyse them, and find paths to strengthen yourself to be able to proudly overcome them. Consideration and respect towards anything, person, or decision is a far greater asset than fear. Fear simply holds humanity back.

5. What is the one “flaw” you wouldn’t change about yourself? I sometimes don’t know when to stop working, trying always to reach a state of perfection! However, I wouldn’t change that as it drives me towards even higher quality.

Designer Spotlight: Make Way For The Talented Kadeem Alphanso Fyffe

Kadeem Alphanso Fyffe is a fashion designer, entrepreneur, actor, and public speaker. He is the founder and creative director of MUXE NEW YORK, and currently serves as the head of design at Acumen; his first collection for the Menswear Label debuts in Fall 2020.

Educated at the University of Richmond and Parsons School of Design, Kadeem has worked in the NYC Fashion Industry since 2013 as a Fashion Designer and Visual Merchandiser for the likes of Michael Kors, Gary Graham, Lyssé, PVH, and Mark Jacobs. His last role was Head of Design at WOLACO. He is an active member of the National Black Justice Coalition, and serves as a volunteer and committee member of NYC-based LGBT youth organization, Live Out Loud.

In 2016 he launched his own clothing label, MUXE NEW YORK, with the intent of creating unisex garments that comment on gender, politics, and culture. Kadeem is a passionate advocate for change to underrepresented communities, with a specific focus on the Black and LGBTQ+ communities.

Kadeem also started working as a commercial model and actor at 19 and has since appeared in TV, Film, and Stage in the US and Australia. He has lived 6 cities across three continents, visited 22 of the 50 U.S. States, and traveled to 15 countries.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Kadeem to discuss his journey in the fashion industry and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

My first internship was in the Women’s Collection at Micheal Kors, which I completed while at Parsons. I completed my graduate studies at Parsons in 2014 and started working professionally as a Women’s RTW designer in New York City.

What do you like most about being a designer?

I love translating my inspirations into a full collection – the whole process of collection development, bringing something from initial concept to full fruition, is my favorite part of being a designer.

The downside to being a fashion designer?

The industry can be very cut-throat at times – some people see this as a downside, but I have always tried to use the competitive nature of the industry to push me to succeed and propel me forward. At Parsons, a student once cut the thread right out of my sewing machine – the joke was on her though because my garment still turned out the best – being better is the sweetest revenge.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

I have had many memorable experiences, but if I had to pick one it would be the first time I worked backstage at NYFW while part of the design team at MK. It was the first time I saw supermodels in real life, and at one point I was 10 feet away from Anna Wintour. This was the moment I knew all my hard work had paid off, and I knew I deserved to be in the room with these people.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

The most interesting people I have met have been during my time as the Head of Design at WOLACO. I was able to meet other young entrepreneurs, fitness influencers, and professional athletes – I found them interesting because they were all hustlers who had mastered the art of self-branding and promotion – and of course, they were insanely fit and easy on the eyes.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

In the famed words of Emily from Devil Wears Prada, “a million girls would kill for this job” – so I’ve always worked my ass off, knowing full well I could be replaced with a quickness.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Yes – my family has always supported my creative pursuits.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

At the beginning of my career, I would have focused more on networking and building and nurturing my professional and personal relationships.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

“Never give up”. It’s very simple.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I plan to continue to grow my business, while always remaining to opportunities to work as a Creative Director for brands that are meaningful to me.

Becoming A Fashion Designer: The Backbreakin Path to Success

I hate to be the one to burst the bubble of fashion enthusiasts, but there are a lot of misconceptions about fashion designing. One of which is the thought that it is easy for you to become part of the statistics of the most popular fashion designers such as Coco Chanel, Alexander McQueen, Louis Vuitton, Georgio Armani, among others. Another misconception is that fashion is all about glamour! Well… Surprise! It’s not. Just like being a famous celebrity, everything that is too good to be true has a certain price to pay for. Third, fashion schools teach only the basic things you need to know. When you eventually go out in the real world to start your business, you will be shocked to find out that you still have a lot to learn.

Passing Through the Eye of a Needle

In all actuality, becoming an established fashion designer is just like becoming a bonafide movie star. It’s like a camel passing through the eye of a needle. First and foremost, you have to compete with famous fashion designers who serve as the edifice of the industry… which is by the way, close to impossible. If you are persistent enough, then, perhaps, you can still land a career in fashion and you might even end up working for a recognized and reputable fashion designer. Start doing your homework and reading other materials that will help you get prepared for the big challenges ahead of you – it’s going to be a bumpy road.

The Price You Have to Pay

If you become an established celebrity, privacy will certainly be a luxury. Do you also know that there are some famous fashion designers that commit suicide? Why is this so? It’s simply because they are not happy…the truth is – behind the fame, popularity, and glamour…there is emptiness deep inside them that cannot be satisfied by self-fulfillment.

Fashion 101

In fashion school, you are taught to sew, draw, sketch, drape and make patterns. Once you have finished the course, you will feel confident that you are equipped with the needed knowledge, skills and values to succeed as a fashion designer. Alas! While the skills you learned in a fashion school are important, some of the stuff you learned is not as practical in the real world of fashion. If you decide to become an intern, you are expected to know how to sketch flats, design clothes using CAD’s, create garment specs and prepare presentation boards. Having said that, it is quite normal that all your ideal expectations will probably be shattered into bits and pieces. Eventually, you’ll realize that you have to mostly self-teach yourself with all the new concepts being thrown at you.

Different Branches of Fashion

Fashion is a massive entity in itself… it is not always about clothes. In fact, there are a lot of niches you can tap into in the fashion industry — you can be a stylist, designer, photographer, forecaster, and merchandiser, among others. If you are lucky enough, you will have the opportunity to experience working with some of them, if not all. And from there, you can weigh things up and determine which category really suits you best. It is important for you to develop an action plan so you’ll more likely have a better chance of reaching your goals.

5 Simple Tips To Maintain The Picture-Perfect Complexion

Our skin reacts to the environment we are in. I’ve worked with hundreds of girls over the years and one of the things I discovered is that not many people change their makeup and skincare seasonally.

It’s a great practice to get into the habit of switching up your key products according to the seasons. As a model, products and layers of heavy makeup are applied on the daily. One of the top priorities for you should be a consistent regime to maintain the perfect complexion. Here are five helpful tips to help save your skin:

More Sunshine = More Sunscreen

Get into the habit of using an SPF daily, as Aussie sun is extremely damaging even though we’re currently in the middle of winter. Whether that be swapping out your foundation for a tinted SPF, or adding a layer of sunscreen as your primer. To avoid issues with pigmentation, loss of collagen, elastin and accelerated signs of aging – always use an SPF30+ when outdoors. SPF 50+ for added points of protection.

You can easily dodge pigmentation concerns when you incorporate a consistent sunscreen routine into your beauty regime. If you have pigment/melasma concerns, serums that are high in Vitamin C, Niacinamide or Retinol are great options for daily treatment.

Detox More Frequently

Always amp up your cleansing and detoxing regime. Ensure you are doing deep cleansing masks or treatments once a week, on top of your daily double cleanse at night with your preferred cleanser (Kaolin clay masks work great, or oxygen activated products are the new rage at the moment). Sunscreen absorbs deeper into the skin, thus cleansing has to be incredibly effective.

Facials are a great way to eliminate toxins via lymphatic drainage and are a cheat way to achieve a glowing complexion within one session. I would highly recommend a facial with a reputable skin clinic with every change of season, that way you are always staying on top of your skin needs.

Don’t Forget Your Toner

When toners first came onto the market, they were laden with heavy acids and alcohol. These are the ones that should be used sparingly, and even avoided!

Hydrating, cleansing toners on a cotton pad as a last step of your cleansing regime will always show you how much makeup and cleanser you didn’t take off (our hands only take off 60% of our makeup, scary times!). It’s so important that we have clean skin before any moisturizer is applied. Toner also helps your serums, and creams penetrate deeper into the skin, so, therefore, you don’t have to use as much cream as you think you need! Win-win!

Bold Trends For Wintertime Glam

There is something about wintertime that calls for elevated glam. I love adding Classic Reds and punchy bright hues of fuchsia or deep oranges to enhance a glowy complexion.

DO: keep your lipstick texture in mind.

If you’re prone to dry lips, opt for creamy formulas, or sheer glossy lipsticks (and be sure to exfoliate your lips beforehand). That way they will fade to a soft tint over the evening. If you don’t feel like touching up over the evening, reach for the punchy mattes and keep the colour within the edges of the lip line. Remember, you don’t need lip liners with matte liquid lipsticks! Still afraid of the bold? Make your lip more wearable by using your finger as the applicator. Then using the tip of your ring finger, softly diffuse the colour around the lip line, creating more of a stained effect.

DON’T: Go overboard with the rest of your makeup when playing up the lip.

Keep the rest of the complexion clean and sophisticated. Meaning, you should keep your eyes softer to bring more attention to the gorgeous bright lip. Opt for bronze shadow. That way you are bringing attention to one area of the face, this is how you create balanced makeup.

About Kim Barry:

While assisting multiple artists, Kim has also worked for Mecca Cosmetica, in both management and artistry for the last six years. With a strong background in skincare teamed with luxury makeup, she has earned a reputation for creating the perfect, photographic complexion. Clients and productions Kim has worked for and collaborated with include; Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia (runway), Best & Less (TVC), Keno (TVC), SBS Australia (film), Masterchef (television), Packed to the Rafters (television), Vogue Living Australia (print), Cosmopolitan Magazine (print), American Apparel (print), General Pants (print), and more. She has also worked alongside several international makeup artists for brand events such as By Terry, Chantecaille, Hourglass, and Stila.

The Brutal Truth Of What It Takes To Be A Fashion Designer

I hate to be the one to burst the bubble of fashion enthusiasts, but there are a lot of misconceptions about fashion designing. One of which is the thought that it is easy for you to become part of the statistics of the most popular fashion designers such as Coco Chanel, Alexander McQueen, Louis Vuitton, Georgio Armani, among others. Another misconception is that fashion is all about glamour! Well… Surprise! It’s not. Just like being a famous celebrity, everything that is too good to be true has a certain price to pay for. Third, fashion schools teach only the basic things you need to know. When you eventually go out in the real world to start your business, you will be shocked to find out that you still have a lot to learn.

Passing Through the Eye of a Needle

In all actuality, becoming an established fashion designer is just like becoming a bonafide movie star. It’s like a camel passing through the eye of a needle. First and foremost, you have to compete with famous fashion designers who serve as the edifice of the industry… which is by the way, close to impossible. If you are persistent enough, then, perhaps, you can still land a career in fashion and you might even end up working for a recognized and reputable fashion designer. Start doing your homework and reading other materials that will help you get prepared for the big challenges ahead of you – it’s going to be a bumpy road.

The Price You Have to Pay

If you become an established celebrity, privacy will certainly be a luxury. Do you also know that there are some famous fashion designers that commit suicide? Why is this so? It’s simply because they are not happy…the truth is – behind the fame, popularity, and glamour…there is emptiness deep inside them that cannot be satisfied by self-fulfillment.

Fashion 101

In fashion school, you are taught to sew, draw, sketch, drape and make patterns. Once you have finished the course, you will feel confident that you are equipped with the needed knowledge, skills and values to succeed as a fashion designer. Alas! While the skills you learned in a fashion school are important, some of the stuff you learned is not as practical in the real world of fashion. If you decide to become an intern, you are expected to know how to sketch flats, design clothes using CAD’s, create garment specs and prepare presentation boards. Having said that, it is quite normal that all your ideal expectations will probably be shattered into bits and pieces. Eventually, you’ll realize that you have to mostly self-teach yourself with all the new concepts being thrown at you.

Different Branches of Fashion

Fashion is a massive entity in itself… it is not always about clothes. In fact, there are a lot of niches you can tap into in the fashion industry — you can be a stylist, designer, photographer, forecaster, and merchandiser, among others. If you are lucky enough, you will have the opportunity to experience working with some of them, if not all. And from there, you can weigh things up and determine which category really suits you best. It is important for you to develop an action plan so you’ll more likely have a better chance of reaching your goals.