Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Cecilia Rinaldi

Cecilia Rinaldi is a brand dedicated to ethical and conscious fashion. Cecilia, with her team, creates clothing and accessories based on environmental and social sustainability using fabrics and organic materials produced in Italy.

Each collection is created with the idea of Slow Fashion, emphasizing sustainability, beauty, longevity and respect for humanity. Italian style is combined with a deconstructed form influenced by different Asian cultures resulting in a refined and minimal urban chic style.

She promotes continual research into new innovative methods while always referencing Italian traditions to maintain high-quality products with a low environmental impact. We believe that providing the option to buy one quality garment over multiple low-quality items contributes to reducing the environmental impact of a wardrobe.

Cecilia Rinaldi is a fashion designer with a professional course of studies of multifaceted experiences that have allowed her to form 360 degrees in the role of sustainable designer, development textile research, pattern and draping maker, and fashion prototypist.

After high school, in 2010, she graduated from Accademia Italiana Art, Fashion and Design in Florence, where she has been teaching since September 2015 and coordinating the Fashion Design department since 2020. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Wales in the same year. After her studies, Cecilia dedicated herself to her professional vocation: she deepened her sartorial techniques, blending design through creative research and the study of materials.

At the Esmod International University of Art for Fashion in Berlin, Cecilia specializes in Fashion Design, completing her training in the creation of stylistic design and sartorial techniques. In 2013 and 2014, she went to the United States. While attending Richland College Multicultural Studies in Dallas, TX, she worked as a fashion designer for private clients and specialized as a buyer working in a Haute Couture Boutique. Traveling assiDuously, Cecilia comes into contact with different contexts and cultures and is always looking for new incentives: she matures and nourishes her style, which draws inspiration from nature and the surrounding environment. which are the inspiration for her research and new ideas. This allows her style to grow continually and mature, keeping her sustainable and artisanal foundation in mind. An essential feature of her modus operandi is the attention to the manual process. Cecilia’s fashion is, first of all, an ethical, sustainable fashion: respect for the environment and for the individual and human rights have always been the reference point in the work process and the creation of her collections.

She has devoted herself to her handmade vocation, deepening her sartorial and design techniques through creative research and the study of materials and fabrics. Cecilia values collaboration and looks for opportunities to volunteer with other sustainable brands around the globe as a way to increase her knowledge and help spread and support the movement of sustainable and ethical fashion locally and around the world.

Sassy & Co magazine recently caught up with Cicilia to discuss her journey in the fashion industry, and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

After my first academic education, in 2010, I a three-year degree from Cardiff University Bachelor of Arts in Fashion Design and an academic diploma from Accademia Italiana Art Fashion Design Piazza Pitti in Florence, where I currently work as a professor and fashion department coordinator, in 2010 I started with my first job in a fashion consultant studio in Modena, my hometown, where I worked as an assistant designer, a researcher of trends and fabrics, developing collections for various fashion brands in the office style. After a couple of years in the studio, in 2012, I attended the ESMOD International Fashion University in Berlin, where I deepened and learned the stylistic skills of fashion and tailoring techniques. Later I moved to the United States, living and working for two years between Dallas and New York, where I started several important fashion collaborations with luxury ateliers and with sustainable independent brands. Finally, in 2015 I returned to Italy, where I decided to open my own sustainable fashion brand Cecilia Rinaldi definitively. it is based between Emilia and Tuscany, Italy, in the meantime starting important collaborations with Italian and international realities companies and specializing more and more in the field of sustainable fashion.

What do you like most about being a designer?

What I like most about being a designer is researching new ideas, trends, and concepts, developing shapes, and researching fabrics and new materials. Get to know other new and existing cultural realities. But perhaps the side that interests me most is in researching textile materials and illustrating fashion sketches. Last but not least, I will never stop being enthusiastic to see how from an idea, we can create a real fashion collection, both wearable and exhibited in important cultural exhibition fairs.

The downside to being a fashion designer?

Maybe one downside to being a fashion designer is its loneliest side, especially during the creation and research phases. During the research, I spent a lot of time alone and often worked late into the night, unfortunately neglecting friends and family.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

Probably the training period I did in the United States: in Dallas and New York City (especially in New York) I had the honor of meeting and collaborating with important designers, influencers, journalists, politicians, personal shoppers, and prominent personalities in the fashion world and society.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

The most interesting people I’ve met so far are Tara St James, an independent sustainable fashion designer, an activist, an expert on supply chain and sustainability, and the personal shoppers of Rihanna and Oprah Winfrey. However, I still know and have the privilege of knowing many realities and famous people. But the discovery of other new cultures will always be the most fascinating part of my job.

What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned in the fashion industry? This can be about the industry or about yourself.

One of the most valuable lessons I have learned while working in the fashion industry is to know the real differences between the world of Fast Fashion and Slow Fashion or Sustainable Fashion. Hundreds and thousands of people are working behind a product in the fashion industry, and most of these are exploited. Unfortunately, behind the fashion system is heavy human and environmental resources exploitation. This was perhaps the most impactful lesson I learned. After several travels and encounters with different cultures and realities, I definitively decided to open my own sustainable fashion brand, trying to contribute to a more right world by activating myself with my work in researching new materials, researching new business fashion models through the creation of my collections and through the education I try to transmit more sustainable values both ethical and environmental, finding new ways to change fashion towards greater transparency and traceability for a sustainable new value chain in the fashion industry.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Absolutely yes. They support me and have always supported me. Without my family and friends, I would never have overcome certain difficulties, stressful moments, and even failures that I have found along the way. I believe having family, supportive friends, and colleagues is essential to undertake this path.

If you could go back in a time machine to when you were just starting, what would you do differently?

Right now, I would say that I would do everything again as I did. I have no regrets and believe there is the right time for everything. Well, maybe I would have moved to Florence first, but who would have known that a global pandemic would come?

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

The best advice I’ve ever been given was probably not to give up in the face of difficulties, to always get involved, not to lose the curiosity that characterizes me, always be critical and aware of what surrounds me, to continue to ask questions but above all never stop smiling.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

My future plans are to live and work in Florence, working and helping my Italian community without forgetting the world. Continue to develop my brand and make it grow, create my annual fashion collections and wedding dresses. Working in education as a professor and researcher consultant in the sustainability area. Therefore, I’d want to create a more stable future: by 2022, I will also open my studio/atelier inside the Il Conventino Caffè Letterario in Florence, a historical building in Florence with a deep sustainable, cultural, and artisanal attitudine surrounded by greenery among artists and craftsmen.

Is It Possible For Virtual Fashion To Break The Harmful Cycle Of Impulse Buying?

During the pandemic, the fast rise of e-commerce platforms increased unplanned spending and impulse purchases. As virtual clothing gains popularity through apps and video games, people may now gratify the urge to buy new items without straining their finances and with minimal environmental harm.

Internet spending continued to set new highs despite increased unemployment and economic difficulties during the pandemic. For example, the share of retail transactions conducted online in the United Kingdom increased by 16% in February 2021 in a single month.

This contradictory behavior may be attributed to people seeking relief through retail therapy, as the pandemic has reportedly increased feelings of anxiety and sadness in young adults by 30%.

With a recent study reporting that 50% of respondents are interested in purchasing a digital asset in the coming year, online spending habits may change again due to reduced financial and environmental costs.

Digital wardrobes substitute traditional shopping

However, alongside an increase in online shopping, lockdowns also accelerated the rise of digital fashion as people turned to online worlds for interaction with other humans. Mainstream clothing trends are becoming increasingly prevalent in video games and apps —  including big-name designers like Louis Vuitton or Moschino experimenting with digital collections.

Virtual clothing pieces come at a fraction of the financial and environmental cost of physical items, meaning people may still experience the gratification of shopping with minimized harm.

“The biggest difference between video game styling and real-life clothes shopping is longevity. The fashion industry and brick and mortar fashion stores need to constantly push the cycle of styles, whether it is seasonal or fad-related; it is in their best interest to retire an old collection and push new inventory to the shelves,” said Povilas Katkevičius, game designer at Nordcurrent, an international developer and publisher of mobile games.

“Video game styling does not require this. Of course, we need to create new items because novelty is always exciting and interesting, but we do not need to retire our collections. We have endless shelf space in the virtual world in which old and new styles can mix into our players’ creations,” he continued.

Replicating real-life purchases virtually

Apps and video games that present a high level of character customization and can replicate real-life shopping experiences present new opportunities to satisfy the impulsive want to shop in a consequence-free environment.

Pocket Styler, which allows players to dress their avatar using items from an extensive catalog of designs, can provide players with the satisfaction of purchasing a new item without needing excessive financial means to do so,” P. Katkevičius explained.

“When designing the app, we studied real e-shops to mimic a smooth and recognizable user interface. As such, it contains a wide range of styles, clothing categories, and accessories that can be purchased through the in-game currency. Despite not receiving a physical item from purchases, a lot of the instant gratification for our community comes from the styling itself,” he explained.

About Nordcurrent

Nordcurrent is the biggest Lithuanian video game developer and publisher, known for such games as Cooking Fever,  Murder in the Alps, Airplane Chefs, Sniper Arena. Focusing on freemium and casual games, the company created over 50 games since 2002, attracting more than half-billion players worldwide.

This article was sourced from a media release sent by Lukas Pereckas of blueoceanspr.com

Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Bree Billiter


Bree Billiter is a Brooklyn-based evening wear designer. Bree was raised on the beaches of Cape Cod, where she began designing at the age of three. A Massart 2014 graduate, she moved to NYC in 2015 to follow her dreams. She designs to allow the wearer to show the world their daydreams outwardly.

Her use of unique materials, striking colors, and intricate detail work transports the wearer right into a world of their daydreams. Each design is one of a kind and stands out in any crowd.

Sassy & Co magazine recently caught up with Bree to discuss her journey in the fashion industry, and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

All I have ever wanted to do was make pretty dresses; I have video of myself designing at three years old.

What do you like most about being a designer?

I just love to create and make things never seen before. I like when my pieces light up the whole room because that’s just magic and I love to create pieces that stop traffic and can transport you to another world.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

I am madly in love with fashion, but sadly the community is just as toxic and cutthroat as it is portrayed in films and TV.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

Seeing my dress in a Disney music video forever will haunt me since designing for Disney has always been my dream.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

My favorite memory is meeting Colleen Atwood right after moving to NYC. She is my idol and the designer I admire most, so that was absolutely surreal.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

Do what you can with what you have, and trust your gut… if it’s too good to be true most of the time, it is. No one will ever fight for your dream as you will.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

I would go to school and get a degree in something that pays a lot. I have learned everything about valuing myself and not from school. The biggest struggle is always money, and money opens up so many doors that a degree can’t.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

When I met Bob Mackie he said “work so hard that one day you can pay people to work hard for you.”

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I just want to create because I love it. I want to create wild pieces, which is what my true love is. Celebrities aren’t wearing many emerging designers right now, so I might as well just create because I love it instead of considering an event or the ability for the celebrity to walk in it.

Are Digital Wardrobes Replacing Traditional Shopping?

During the pandemic, the fast rise of e-commerce platforms increased unplanned spending and impulse purchases. As virtual clothing gains popularity through apps and video games, people may now gratify the urge to buy new items without straining their finances and with minimal environmental harm.

Despite increased unemployment and economic difficulties during the pandemic, internet spending continued to set new highs. For example, the share of retail transactions conducted online in the United Kingdom increased by 16% in February 2021 in a single month.

This contradictory behavior may be attributed to people seeking relief through retail therapy, as the pandemic has reportedly increased feelings of anxiety and sadness in young adults by 30%.

With a recent study reporting that 50% of respondents are interested in purchasing a digital asset in the coming year, online spending habits may change again due to reduced financial and environmental costs.

Digital wardrobes substitute traditional shopping

However, alongside an increase in online shopping, lockdowns also accelerated the rise of digital fashion as people turned to online worlds for interaction with other humans. Mainstream clothing trends are becoming increasingly prevalent in video games and apps —  including big-name designers like Louis Vuitton or Moschino experimenting with digital collections.

Virtual clothing pieces come at a fraction of the financial and environmental cost of physical items, meaning people may still experience the gratification of shopping with minimized harm.

“The biggest difference between video game styling and real-life clothes shopping is longevity. The fashion industry and brick and mortar fashion stores need to constantly push the cycle of styles, whether it is seasonal, or fad-related, it is in their best interest to retire an old collection and push new inventory to the shelves,” said Povilas Katkevičius, game designer at Nordcurrent, an international developer and publisher of mobile games.

“Video game styling does not require this. Of course, we need to create new items, because novelty is always exciting and interesting, but we do not need to retire our collections. We have endless shelf space in the virtual world in which old and new styles can mix into our players’ creations,” he continued.

Replicating real-life purchases virtually

Apps and video games that present a high level of character customization and can replicate real-life shopping experiences present new opportunities to satisfy the impulsive want to shop in a consequence-free environment.

Pocket Styler, which allows players to dress their avatar using items from an extensive catalog of designs, can provide players with the satisfaction of purchasing a new item without needing excessive financial means to do so,” P. Katkevičius explained.

“When designing the app, we studied real e-shops to mimic a smooth and recognizable user interface. As such, it contains a wide range of styles, clothing categories, and accessories that can be purchased through the in-game currency. Despite not receiving a physical item from purchases, a lot of the instant gratification for our community comes from the styling itself,” he explained.

About Nordcurrent

Nordcurrent is the biggest Lithuanian video game developer and publisher, known for such games as Cooking Fever,  Murder in the Alps, Airplane Chefs, Sniper Arena. Focusing on freemium and casual games, the company created over 50 games since 2002, attracting more than half-billion players worldwide.

This article was sourced from a media release sent by Lukas Pereckas of blueoceanspr.com

Photo by ANTONI SHKRABA 

Introducing The 2022 Afterpay Australian Fashion Week On The Cover Of The June 2022 Issue Of Sassy & Co

To celebrate the 2022 Afterpay Australian Fashion Week, Sassy & Co went on the ground at Sydney Fashion Week to capture some of the most fabulous collections and notable street style photos outside the shows. We captured some of the best and most promising designers at Carriageworks – Check out our exclusive fashion show coverage featuring Torannce, Gyre the label, and Iordanes Spyridon Gogos’.

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Iordanes Spyridon Gogos & Powerhouse Museum Unveil Iconic Collaboration For Afterpay Australian Fashion Week 2022

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – MAY 12: Jenny Kee walks the runway during the Iordanes Spyridon Gogos show during Afterpay Australian Fashion Week 2022 Resort ’23 Collections at the Powerhouse Museum on May 12, 2022 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)

On Thursday, 12 May 2022, the Powerhouse staged Iordanes Spyridon Gogos’ (ISG) highly anticipated runway show for Afterpay Australian Fashion Week (AAFW) 2022. The unique collaboration transformed the Powerhouse’s iconic Boiler Hall for the first AAFW runway show in the museum’s 142-year history.

The Powerhouse workshop team collaborated with ISG to realise the vibrant ‘deconstructed castle’ runway. Artistic direction was led by Benn Hamilton, set design by Max Rixon, and spatial design by Tayarch Design Studio, all mainstay ISG collaborators who worked with the Powerhouse team to create more than 15 sculptural works along with painted banners, set pieces, and wearable art objects.

Jenny Kee and Jordan Gogos, Iordanes Spyridon Gogos Afterpay Australian Fashion Week 2022 at Powerhouse. Image: Getty.

More than 1,000 hours of labour over five weeks and 123 litres of fluorescent paint, including much reused from previous exhibition projects, went into the collaboration. The full breadth of the workshop team’s skills and experience was showcased, from entry-level to experienced artisans and tradespeople with 30 years of experience across metal, timber, and scenic work, plus drawing and 3D modelling.

The Powerhouse workshop was amongst 60 Australian and international collaborators from the creative industries engaged to realise 33 singular looks for the runway show. One stand-out was a steel ‘tubular vest’ designed by Benn Hamilton and crafted by the Powerhouse workshop, which housed a floral arrangement by the Colour Blind Florist Benjamin Avery. The workshop also collaborated on NYC-based artist Patrick Church’s sculptural look.

ISG’s collaboration with Australian fashion veteran Jenny Kee AO opened and closed the show. ISG utilised recycled materials from ‘Step Into Paradise’ (Kee and Linda Jackson’s seminal Powerhouse retrospective) for the lining of garments, shoes, set design, and other elements. Kee’s archive of iconic prints and motifs, including her signature ‘Earth First’ scarf, were translated into textile designs by Brittney Wyper and incorporated into new garments. The designer herself made a runway cameo alongside her granddaughter.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – MAY 12: Designer Jordan Gogos thanks the audience with Jenny Kee following the the Iordanes Spyridon Gogos show during Afterpay Australian Fashion Week 2022 Resort ’23 Collections at the Powerhouse Museum on May 12, 2022 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)

In his unique graphic style, Apollo Michaelides illustrated textile designs with cartoons featuring references to the Powerhouse’s expansive collection. Victoria Todorov’s textile designs also referenced a variety of collection objects for a garment designed by Shanghai-based Jake Siu. Photo media artist and sculptor Anna Pogossova’s oversized coins, seen on shoes, garments and jewellery, referenced real and counterfeit ancient Greek coins from the Powerhouse collection.

In collaboration with Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert, ISG presented a silhouette which captures the fashion label’s relationship with Sally and the Gallery. Clad in jacket and skirt, the model represented Sally as the gallery director, while a ‘shell’ reflected the distinct, considered textures of the gallery architecture, with a headdress symbolising the gallery’s iconic ‘halo’ light entrance.

Winner of the National Indigenous Fashion Awards 2021 Simone Arnol, working in collaboration with masters of Ghostnet woven totemic artworks Pormpuraaw Art Centre and Yarrabah Arts and Culture, presented a series of designs combining recycled fishing nets, textiles, and printed fabrics.


Jordan Gogos and Jenny Kee, backstage at Iordanes Spyridon Gogos AAFW 2022 Runway Show, Powerhouse. Collaborators: Patrick Church, Brittany Wyper, Max Rixon, Julia Baldini. Model: Kyva/Kyle. Image by Jamie Heath.

The show was presented alongside a curated Powerhouse Late program, which included a live stream of the runway show into the Powerhouse Theatre alongside artwork projections, documentary screenings and music curated by FBi Radio.  The runway show will remain available to view on the Powerhouse’s YouTube channel.

“The Powerhouse is thrilled to present our collaboration with ISG for AAFW 2022. Since our collaboration was first announced, Jordan’s epic vision has expanded in new and exciting ways. Galvanising the resources of the Powerhouse workshop team and production teams, this marked a momentous moment for the museum, transforming the iconic Boiler Hall into the world of Jordan Gogos” said Powerhouse Chief Executive Lisa Havilah.

Jordan Gogos and Jenny Kee, backstage at Iordanes Spyridon Gogos AAFW 2022 Runway Show, Powerhouse. Collaborators: Yarrabah Arts and Culture, Pormpuraaw Art, Julia Baldini. Model: Abbey. Image by Jamie Heath.

“Our collaboration with the Powerhouse has enabled us to realise the full scale and magnitude of our creative vision for this year’s Afterpay Australian Fashion Week runway show. Being embedded in the Powerhouse Ultimo Creative Industries Precinct as a Resident has generated thrilling new collaborations. Access to the incredible workshop facilities and production team at Powerhouse Ultimo has elevated the show to new heights in the iconic Boiler Hall,” said ISG founder Jordan Gogos.

Afterpay Australian Fashion Week is an IMG event proudly supported by the New South Wales Government through its tourism and major events agency, Destination NSW.


Jordan Gogos and Jenny Kee, backstage at Iordanes Spyridon Gogos AAFW 2022 Runway Show, Powerhouse. Collaborators: Jenny Kee, Ruby Peddler, Brittany Wyper, Max Rixon, Sacred Honeys, Julia Baldini. Model: Stefania Gertis. Image by Jamie Heath.

Jordan Gogos and Jenny Kee, backstage at Iordanes Spyridon Gogos AAFW 2022 Runway Show, Powerhouse. Collaborators: Max Rixon, Jo Morton, Jenny Kee, Sacred Honeys, Julia Baldini. Model: Elliot. Image by Jamie Heath.

Spotted: TORANNCE At The Afterpay Australia Fashion Week 2022

TORANNCE is an Australian elevated contemporary label dedicated to timelessness, luxury, and wear-ability. Paying homage to vintage trends and muses, TORANNCE plays on eccentricities and eye-catching details while still being completely wearable and something that can take you from day to night.

TORANNCE was established by Julia Torannce Hemingway in 2015. Having studied a Bachelor of Business and working within the fashion industry for almost a decade, Hemingway felt she needed to create her own label so that she could push the design boundaries without limitation.

With a strong emphasis on quality, all TORANNCE garments are designed using premium materials, including natural fabrications, ethically sourced leathers, and beautiful hand-embellished materials.

Check out their collection below at the 2022 Afterpay Australian Fashion Week courtesy of Dave Choo.

Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Kavya Prakhyati

Kavya Prakhyati is a 27-year-old Boston-based designer focused on creating sustainable fashion rooted in femininity and romance. She draws inspiration from couture techniques, renaissance paintings, 90s movies, and her Indian heritage.

Kavya graduated with a certificate from the school of fashion design in 2019 and apprenticed for Daniel Faucher Couture, learning the craft of tailored, custom-made garments. Some of her garments have appeared on independent magazine covers, and a collection of her garments were featured in Boston Fashion Week.

Her handmade-to-order garment addresses and empowers different body types and design needs through the use of traditional sewing techniques. She believes that her customers should buy her pieces because they truly speak to them. It just so happens that she encourages sustainable production and empowers everyone along the way.

Sassy & Co magazine recently caught up with Kavya to discuss her journey in the fashion industry and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I started off studying marketing and worked as a market analyst. I wanted to pursue a career in fashion, and I was always drawn to it ever since school. For many reasons, I chose to play safe with my career choice until I realised it wasn’t for me and decided to do what I always wanted. I went back to school to study Fashion Design, which really helped me develop my technical skills. I have been doing this for five years now (I did internships with very talented and established designers in Boston and got my first job as a technical designer in New York) and have never looked back.

What do you like most about being a designer?

Seeing the ideas come to life! I spend a lot of time drafting patterns/draping, manipulating fabric, sewing the garment using intricate details, and then finally seeing it on my clients or models is a total dream come true, especially when they notice the little details and tell you how they feel in the dress.

Meeting other creatives in the industry is another thing I love. I’m always meeting new people (online & in-person), and listening to different perspectives and ideas is always refreshing!

Downside to being a fashion designer?

Someone commented on my TikTok saying, “how does it feel to live my dream?” and I wanted to respond by listing several reasons why the fashion industry is difficult. Still, the truth is that although many downsides exist, they can all be overcome with workable solutions. That being said, the fashion industry is very demanding, both financially and time-wise. Another downside is that the fashion industry is so saturated that it’s hard to stand out, so you have to work really hard to differentiate yourself and be seen. Made-to-order designers, in particular, have trouble finding success in this ‘fast-paced, inexpensive clothing’ environment because their goods don’t have a quick turnaround time and are expensive. Thankfully, the situation is one of the most talked-about topics at the moment, so it’s easier to educate consumers about the trade-off and true cost.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

I would have to say that one of my most (recent) memorable experiences was having Dodie (a British singer-songwriter) perform in one of my garments. A true pinch-me moment! Her initiative to support independent designers is very thoughtful. Kudos to her and her team!

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

I’ve had an incredible opportunity to meet so many models, photographers, teachers, and other designers in the industry! (All the pictures you see are works of these incredible artists, you will find them tagged in my Instagram account.) They truly changed my perspective on competition. For me, now, it is all about supporting each other and uplifting each other as a community because I truly understand what it takes. I’m so glad I got a chance to meet some of these creatives; they are all very interesting with unique personalities and backgrounds.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

#1. Quality>>>Quantity and #2. I don’t have to be a genius protege with an exuberant personality to convince people to like what I make. Just take some challenges, don’t downplay accomplishments, get hands-on experience, and invest in skill and practice. Who would have thought? Not me!

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

I am very grateful that my family and friends are always there for me and encourage me to follow my dreams. They’ve been very supportive of my new venture.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

Cliche, but I can’t say I’d do anything differently because I would definitely have valued the opportunity to learn from my mistakes more. If I could go back, I’d take some financial, sewing, and confidence tips and a few self-help books with me.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

Do your best, and watch your best get better.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I am excited about my future plans! Right now, my plan is to continue working with my current company for the foreseeable future. I’m working on launching my brand ‘Aeris’ late this year or early next year, where I take custom orders and also launch mini collections twice a year which are also customisable and made-to-order. Follow me on my Instagram @kavyaprakhyati to order, see my pieces in action, or just follow along my journey. I am also very keen on learning 3D software (like clo3d and browzwear). I’m curious, could this be the answer to all my sustainable custom fashion business problems?

Photo credits: Lena Nugent, Sasha Iman, Anna Istomina, and Siobhan Beasley.

Event To Watch Out For: Afterpay Australian Fashion Week

What: Afterpay Australian Fashion Week (AAFW) engages the industry alongside fashion’s most passionate consumers in one dynamic program, marrying physical and digital activations that celebrate Australia’s preeminent designers and fashion’s cultural influence.

Australia’s only international fashion event, AAFW takes place annually in Sydney and is the premier destination for Resort collections.

Where: Carriageworks – 245 Wilson Street Eveleigh NSW 2015

When: 9-13 MAY