Emerging Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Becki Ball

Becki Ball currently lives in Norfolk, Norwich, and since graduating from the Norwich University of the Arts last year, she launched her label BECCI. Her work is inspired by the contrast of ‘streetwear meets elegance .’ Her womenswear designs are heavily print-based, portraying a bold sense of confidence and empowerment. Femininity is key to her pieces, and this is highlighted with her sense of colour and silhouette. She has recently collaborated with fashion label SHEIN to create two collections, with her first curve collection launching in Winter.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Becki to discuss her journey in the fashion world, and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I graduated last year from the Norwich University of the Arts, and since graduating in Fashion Design, I have been working on my brand BECCI. When growing up, I have always loved fashion, and during my time at Sixth Form before university, I studied textiles. I took part in local fashion shows for which I made my own clothing; I worked backstage at fashion shows and took on styling work experience when I could. During my gap year before going to university, I launched my brand, and from there, I started buying wholesale pieces. I really loved the marketing side to the brand and putting photoshoots together, collaborating with local creatives, and managing the social media side to things. When I started university to study Fashion Design, I realised that I wanted to design and make my own pieces to sell and be more sustainable- instead of buying general wholesale designs to sell to my customers.

What do you like most about being a designer?

I love how creative it is and that fashion is a form of communication and expression of how we feel, our personality, and who we are. The process of a simple 2D sketch becoming a final wearing garment is incredible; there is no other feeling quite like it, and that sense of accomplishment and achievement is so rewarding. I love styling my pieces for the shoots, learning new techniques, and meeting other creatives along the way.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

Probably the amount of time one has to put in to get ‘somewhere’. Fashion isn’t easy, and many people have a false conception that fashion is simple. Not many people see the hard work (and tears) behind creating a collection or project! The other downside to being a fashion designer is believing in myself- sometimes, self-doubt is the worst. There is no set path for becoming a designer – and I think that is what makes it difficult (but also great), as there is no one’ right’ way to become a fashion designer or easy path to follow.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

My most memorable experience so far has been the SHEIN X 100k Challenge. This was so incredible! I made it through to the top 30 of the competition, where I got to create my 3 looks and put together a look book for this in the space of about 3 weeks. Sourcing fabric samples, getting my fabric printed, sourcing final fabrics, making the patterns for the designs, sampling the pieces, creating the final looks- and organising a photoshoot was extremely hard work! However, on the day of the shoot, seeing the looks on the models and having everything come together was phenomenal! The late nights, endless work, and stress had definitely paid off! Then, not only did that happen, but we got to be part of the SHEIN X 100k Challenge show series that was aired on the SHEIN app! I was also awarded the SHEIN Choice Award for my collection!

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

Probably my class members at university. The amount of talent and determination they have is amazing, and I love how different we all are! Everyone there had a totally unique design style and aesthetic, and for me, that was really inspiring. I loved hearing about their inspiration and what they were going to design next.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

I think budgeting is really important, and the SHEIN X 100k Challenge Shoot was the first project and shoot I got to do with a budget. I loved being able to pay my team for their hard work, but I think next time, I would have liked to manage the budget better and more equally. However, this is something I will improve on in the future. The most valuable lesson I think is probably just believing in myself, this challenge made me realise that I can do this, and even with an extremely tight deadline, it is still possible!

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Yes, they are; although they do not have any ‘fashion’ background, they always ask me about my projects (and sometimes are quite surprised at what I am working on!) My mum helped me prepare for the big SHEIN x 100k Challenge photoshoot late at night before the shoot, taping the bottom of the shoes for my models so that I could still return them!

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

I think this is a difficult question; I would love to have not had the pandemic happen if this was something I could have stopped, as I felt like I missed out on a lot of opportunities that I was looking forward to for my final year at uni. However, because of the pandemic, I believe some of the opportunities I have met online and worked with SHEIN happened because of this. So I probably would not change anything as everything happens for a reason.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

I think being open-minded, always be open to learning. You might not do something perfectly the first time, but giving it a go and getting started is the only way you can progress forward.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I would like to launch more collections in collaboration with SHEIN and launch my own Ready To Wear collection. My overall goal is to have a successful fashion label I can live off, produce consistent collections, be part of runway shows, work with celebrities, and have my own team behind the brand! Outside of my career, I would love to move out soon and have my own fashion home studio.

This Mobile Game for Fashionistas Attracts 8 Million Players in 5 Months

An engaging social game for women “Pocket Styler” attracts 2M downloads in launch month alone, collaborates with designers to create trendy in-game content, and yet collaborate with designer brands as well.

Every week, nearly half a million new players join Pocket Styler – a new fashion game for mobile devices that focuses on dressing up the avatar for different occasions, where created looks are being rated by the community of users. The creators attribute the cause of the growing popularity of the game to its’ non-urgent nature, where a player can relax and simply enjoy the process, enabling the focus on creativity – over 147 million different outfit looks have already been created by the game users.

The action of Pocket Styler takes place in New York, one of the global fashion meccas. The player arrives at the Big Apple, taking a chance to make it big by attending various social events and exploring their dress code requirements. After carefully curating their look, the players evaluate other players’ styles and are appraised by them in turn, helping develop style and design sensibility, while exploring their sense of style virtually.

“Unlike most casual games, Pocket Styler takes it slow,” says Nordcurrent’s Game Designer Povilas Katkevičius. “Players are in no rush as they take their time to warm up their imagination, find a door to freedom, and express themselves freely. While the most competitive players can focus on quality and strive for perfection in each detail, others can explore current trends and find inspiration for their real-life wardrobe.”

With predecessors such as Cooking Fever (over 400 million downloads), Sniper Arena (70 million) and Murder in the Alps (20 million), Pocket Styler is Nordcurrent’s most recent release. “Our goal was to create an engaging social game for women,” claims Victoria Trofimova, the CEO of Nordcurrent. “As the audience of women playing mobile games is growing globally, we felt a need to respond to this tendency.”

When Pocket Styler launched in May, the game obtained 2 million users in the first month and increased four-fold in 5 months. As nearly half a million players join the style platform every week, its’ social media community also continues to grow exponentially.

The game is curated by fashion professionals and a team of experienced stylists, and will very soon open to collaborations with designer brands worldwide. Pocket Styler will enable their creations to appear in digital form, while the players will be able to dress their models in real-life designer clothing and accessories. Now, all the clothing is custom-made for the platform, with designers and game developers working side by side to develop custom looks. In addition to bi-weekly content expansions, the company has plans to expand localisations to Asia primarily Japan and South Korea as well as implement more socializing elements, such as Style houses, where players would collaborate to achieve cooperative goals, exchange items, and compete among other groups.

About Nordcurrent

Nordcurrent is the biggest Lithuanian video game developer and publisher, known for such releases as Cooking Fever,  Murder in the Alps, Airplane Chefs, Sniper Arena. Focusing on freemium and casual games, the company created over 50 games since 2002, attracting more than half billion players  worldwide.

This article was sourced from a media release sent by Gabrijela Petrikyte @ Blue Oceans PR

Emerging Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Tania Orellana Negrete

Tania Orellana Negrete is a 24-years-old fashion designer who hails from Irapuato, Guanajuato in Mexico. She’s an industrial designeer, but fashion has always been her passion. She initially started in the fashion world as a model, but then because she had a knack for fashion design, she decided to pursue this passion. This career was perfect for her because it opened her mind to the creative world – she started creating her brand just like a project for school, and to her surprise, it blew up! She’s only had a year with her brand, and she can’t believe how far she has come.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Tania to discuss her journey in the fashion world, and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

Well, I think when you want something, you will eventually attract it. Since I was in school, I talked and asked everyone I knew about my interests, and with time, the opportunities arrived. Eventually, with the support of all the people who love me, it prompted me to do what I love. Because of my interests, I ended up in school. And because of my school and teachers, I ended up in my first fashion job, and I was able to create my brand. And because of my brand, now I’m growing a lot, meeting a lot of successful people, and having amazing fashion experiences.

What do you like most about being a designer?

Each collection has a full concept and a history to tell. So it’s amazing for me to create and put together all the elements that perfectly create and express myself through my clothes because each concept is about my beliefs, future, and what I love.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

The fashion industry is so big and strong that it can put you off so easily if you don’t have an open mind.

>> It’s impossible to be creative all the time<<

It sounds crazy, and it was hard for me to accept that because” I’m a designer.” But it’s real. To be a good creator, you need to disconnect the fashion world from your mind and think beyond.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

I love everything about fashion. From the beginning until now, all the way has been memorable because it is part of what I am now. Of course, I had amazing experiences like NYFW and a collaboration with Shein. But the real thing is that the memorable experiences for me are the ones that nobody can see, like the launching of my first collection, the happiness of doing what I love, or knowing the right people in the right place at the right moment, who inspires me and impulse me to keep going and keep doing incredible things.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

In my last project in NYFW, I met three people that opened my eyes and inspired me a lot. They are the influencer Tania Rendon, the stylist Neto Soberanes and the fashion designer Ricarso Seco. Each one had a different life, but almost the same thinking – that for me is the key to their success.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

The fashion industry is so big but so small at the same time. You can see big companies unreachable when in reality, they are not so impossible to reach. So the lesson is: go for all you want. Even if you think that it’s too much for you. Go for it because it’s incredible once you have it.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Totally. I’m so grateful to have all the support that my family and friends give me. The people who love me know what I love and what I want to achieve, so the real thing is that it is not just the support but the impulse to achieve my dreams.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

I had an excessive production in my first collection because I thought that I was going to sell everything, and it was hard for me because it wasn’t… But you need to fall to learn, so I would not change anything. Just do all step by step and get better in my financial part.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

Decree it, and it will be. Be sure of what you want, take action, and you will have it.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

Now I’m going to move to Milano to start a master, grow my brand, and get closer to the luxury fashion world. So in the future, I will have a luxury and bigger brand with international recognition. And let will see what else happens on my way… I have my mind open!

Status Symbols… Does Wearing A Rolex Make You Popular?

They say, fashion changes; trends wither but luxury and style last forever. In the case of luxury Rolex watches, this saying stands to be true. Ever since 1910, when the luxury watch company Rolex got a Swiss certification for maintaining its distinctive quality and make, the brand has not looked back. Let it be Gen X or the millennials or Gen Z; when it comes to owning a Rolex watch, the opinions are unanimous. Everyone wants one!

Rolex is literally the fashion watch goal even in this age and era and owning one means you are loaded! Here are some reasons for its massive popularity. Let’s get into it.

#1 A Rolex Watch Is An Acquired Taste

Unlike fast-fashion accessories and brands that mushroom every five or six years out of nowhere with their generic styles and fits to appeal to a crowd, Rolex targets a truly specific audience. Its users and clientele are premium and it’s not made to appeal to the masses. This is one of the reasons you don’t see it floating everywhere. It’s an acquired taste and that just adds to its charm.

#2 A Touch of Luxury

Rolex watches are specifically designed and manufactured for men and women who have a knack for luxury and indulgence. The extravagant designs are part of the appeal and experience of owning a donning a Rolex. Wrapping it around your wrist would oomph up your confidence and make you feel pampered and good about yourself. There’s a reason why Rolex is simply a class apart!

#3 A Rolex Watch is the Stuff Family Heirlooms are made of!

Now that’s not a shocker! When grandmas pass on their princess cut diamond rings; luxury gemstone clustered tiaras and vintage silk gowns to their upcoming generation of young women, a Rolex watch is a prized possession that could be passed on to the new generation of the fine young men of the family. The brand is known to make watches with a lifetime warranty and there are families who cherish these as their prized possessions.

#4 The Social Factor

Rolex watches have been a cult classic! From the Royal family to A-list Hollywood celebrities and stars – Rolex watches have been adorned, cherished, and endorsed by countless famous people. This just serves as the cherry on the top to add more to their popularity.

Leading Global Smart Wearable Brand, Amazfit Partners Up With Fashion Trailblazer Christian Cowan

(PRNewsfoto/Amazfit)

Leading global smart wearable brand, Amazfit, announced today an exciting new partnership with fashion trailblazer Christian Cowan who becomes the brand’s official GTR 3 and GTS 3 Series Experience Consultant.

The partnership begins today in tandem with the launch of Amazfit’s three new styles of smartwatches: GTR 3 PRO, GTR 3 and the GTS 3.

Where Fashion Meets Innovative Technology 

Amazfit is the brand that encourages users to live their passions with infinite possibilities. As a fashion-conscious technology accessory company, Amazfit also creates products that encourage customers to lead a healthy and active lifestyle.

This unique partnership with Christian Cowan inspires Amazfit customers to combine fashion and modern technology creating a statement of personal style that can be enjoyed all year round. The GTR 3 PRO, GTR 3 and GTS 3 are built to help people take their first steps into smart fitness while looking super-stylish and align with Christian Cowan’s vibrant fashion sense.

“It’s been an incredible opportunity for me being appointed Experience Consultant with Amazfit. The timing was so perfect this season coming out of the real first fashion week since the pandemic happened. I really had to up my game and the Amazfit GTR 3 Pro has been an integral part in the balancing act of my professional and personal life,” comments Christian Cowan.

The Amazfit GTR 3 and GTS 3 series are perfect for matching with formal, leisure, and sports outfits and activities. Easy-to-use, the smartwatches feature comprehensive health and fitness monitoring and ultra-long battery life, powered by the intuitive Zepp OS.

The new OS is tailored to optimize the performance of Amazfit smart wearable devices – instead of transferring a power-draining smartphone OS to users’ wrists. Built around the concept of being light, smooth and practical, this OS enables easier interaction and helps users eliminate tedious operations with lower power consumption compared to the previous smartwatch operating systems.

The user can also test four health metrics in just one tap thanks to the built-in 6PD (photodiodes) BioTracker™ PPG 3.0, which measures four health metrics (heart rate, blood-oxygen, stress level and breathing rate) in as little as 45 seconds.

About Amazfit

Amazfit is a leading global smart wearable brand that offers a wide product portfolio including smart watches and bands, TWS earbuds, and health & fitness devices such as smart treadmills and smart body composition scales. Our brand essence is Up Your Game, and we encourage users to live their passions and express their active spirits freely.

Amazfit is a brand owned by Zepp Health (NYSE: ZEPP) that has shipped over 100 million devices since 2014, with products available in over 90 countries and regions. For more information, visit www.amazfit.com

About Christian Cowan

Christian Cowan represents New York nightlife re-defined for the modern woman.

After studying at Central Saint Martins in London, Christian moved to New York and established a celebrity fan base that spans multiple industries.

Having outfitted some of the world’s biggest stars, Christian has partnered with global consumer brands to bring his signature head-turning style to fashion fans around the world.

Source : Amazfit

This article was sourced from a media release sent by PR Newswire

Emerging Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Lidia Kokowicz

Lidia Kokowicz is a fashion designer who hails from Poland – she’s a graphic designer by education. Fashion has been with her since she was a child; from illustrations to changing into different outfits and shoes that were lying in her mother’s wardrobe – even then, she knew that she wanted to create her own projects. She won a scholarship at the Polish Fashion School, and she actively takes part in nationwide and international competitions – she has been published in various fashion magazines and has won many awards and distinctions. At the moment she’s working on her graduation collection at the School of Artistic Fashion Design in Krakow to obtain the title of fashion designer.

Her designs are appreciated by stylists and artists from all over the world. She transfers geometricity to her new fashion ideas, she deviates from patterns, and she likes large forms and interesting textures. She also paints clothes by hand and remakes shoes.

Some of her accomplishments include being asked to participate in the Cracow Fashion Awards fashion shows as a stylist, working with Karolina Płocka from the “Top Model” program – Polish edition, appearing in several publications such a Horizont magazine, Edith Magazine, Imirage magazine, Scorpio Jin Magazine and Malvie magazine. She has also been featured on the global American platform NOT JUST A LABEL based in London and Los Angeles, her artistic mask has been published in the Argentinian catalog of Centro Argentino de Arte Textil, and she won first place in the Polish Talent Support 2018 international competition in the FASHION category.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Lidia to discuss her journey in the fashion world and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

Since I was a child, I dreamed of entering the world of fashion. I was blessed with talent, I kept drawing dolls and characters. I bought a lot of fashion magazines, read interviews with designers, watched beautifully styled stars, and photo sessions. I decided that after studying graphic design I want to do a second school – Fashion. I managed to take 1st place in an international competition for my own collection, and the prize was a scholarship at the School of Artistic Fashion Design in Krakow. This is how I started creating dreams.

What do you like most about being a designer?

I know I’m in the right place, people like what I do. First of all, I combine work with passion, develop my own creativity, and meet a lot of interesting people. I love the moments when I get a lot of nice messages, questions, and requests for loans of my pieces. However, what I love the most is when, after completing the entire project, I am fully happy with the effect I wanted to achieve, even though it sometimes lasts all night. I know that my effort and fatigue were not wasted.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

If you love what you do, you don’t see any drawbacks in it, but in this profession, you can’t allow yourself to drop in form – you have to endure criticism and believe in yourself. In this world, one should be strong and confident. Stress keeps me motivated.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

My first fashion show for sure! I was accompanied then by various emotions. I really wanted my styling to be perfect. I remember standing backstage waiting for my model to perform. I couldn’t believe it was happening, that I was there. Eventually, it hit me when my projects suddenly appeared in the public eye. I was very touched, to the point of tears. The second such situation took place at the Final Gala of the International Off Fashion Competition 2021, when the well-known and Polish fashion designer Marcin Paprocki, from the Paprocki & Brzozowski duo, personally wrote a message on my Instagram recognizing my projects. That was the second time I was so excited. For a novice designer, it is a great honor to read such words from a respected personage in the world of fashion.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

Certainly, stylists who dress other interesting artists. This broadens your friendships. It’s also important in this world, it’s good to show yourself. I also have fond memories of my collaboration with Karolina Płocka, a participant in the Polish edition of the “Top Model” program. She accepted my invitation to a photoshoot with my projects. That day the whole team couldn’t believe how I managed to convince Karolina to come. After all, we all knew her from TV before. As I mentioned earlier, my designs were also assessed by well-known Polish designers from the duo Paprocki & Brzozowski in the Final of the International Off Fashion Competition 2021. In this profession, it is important to be able to meet such people, above all not to be intimidated of it.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

I learned patience and humility. I go ahead and do not look back at others. Some situations were supposed to happen, some the time would come. Always do your best. I remember many times when I couldn’t cope with fatigue and stress. However, I did not give up and I was rewarded for it. The fashion industry is for persistent and stubborn people. Another lesson is taking your own initiative. It bears fruit after a while. It all shaped my character and confidence a lot.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

My family is a huge supporter of my work. They always cheer me on and enjoy my successes. In my case, everything happens very quickly, my mother can’t keep up and grabs her head with joy, because at one point, she wanted to be a fashion designer herself.

They appreciate my work, which I devote to the implementation of projects. My mother often advises me when it comes to sewing various elements of clothing because she has experience in this. It gives her pleasure.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

I don’t think I would change anything. Studying computer graphics, which I finished studying first, helps me in knowing programs, and these, as you know, are useful in fashion designing. In fact, the pandemic brought more creativity and energy out of me. I could spend more time on self-realization and showing myself as a fashion designer. I have a very positive response from my audience. I am at the right moment in my life, I am very happy with all my achievements, and I am going up. Even more and more interesting challenges come to me, I love what I do, I just continue to make my dreams come true.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

A lot of work, a lot of work, and a lot of work again!

I like it when the things I create are fully original and refined in every detail. Sometimes I prefer to make one great creation than ten bad ones. I am fully involved in my work as a designer, sometimes it involves some sacrifices. There are days when I spend the whole day working on projects, while my family or friends have a great time. I always reward myself for those days. I am used to the fact that working on continuous ideas is part of the profession of a designer.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

At this stage, I’m in the process of creating my graduation collection.

In the meantime, I have designed my own collection – you can follow my Instagram profile @kokowicz_lidia, and you will soon find out where my collection will be available.

In addition, I would like to start cooperating with an interesting sewing room, because I am thinking of designing my own footwear. I also hope that I will have the pleasure to dress an interesting red carpet star in my clothes. Of course, in the future, I intend to open my own brand.

Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Incredible Luom Ousby

Luom Ousby is a luxury minimalist at heart. The Vietnam-born and New Zealand-raised designer first took up needle and thread as a child, designing and sewing her first garments with her mother at just 8 years of age, and setting her on a course that would take her to fashion college and culminate with a Diploma in Fashion Design & Textile in 1996.

Her distinctive signature style was recognised the following year when she placed as runner-up in the prestigious New Zealand Smoke-Free Fashion Awards, collecting a slew of high distinctions in the process.

Fashion designer Luom Ousby walks runway with models at the close of her show Luom.O collection fashion show, for Fashion Palette Australian Evening & Bridal Show Spring Summer 2016, duing New York Fashion Week Spring 2016.

In 1998 Luom relocated to Sydney and by 2006 she had set up shop in fashion-hub Paddington, bringing her vision of luxury minimalism to life by catering to brides and special event customers looking for style well beyond the mainstream. Her form-fitting gowns have become her staple and have been worn by many celebrities.

Over 20 years of working with brides, in particular, has provided Luom with unparalleled experience into what they really want and what makes them happy. “My edge as a designer is my insight into the women who embrace a minimalist aesthetic and how they want to convey their identity on a day when all eyes are on them.

Designing is telling a story. My designs are all about the woman wearing the dress, rather than the dress wearing the woman. I believe a woman should ultimately look and feel sexy in whatever she wears. My definition of sexy is about not being obvious – it’s about being subtle in order to create mystique. Revealing less, whilst hinting at more through form, is the key to being alluring”

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Luom to discuss her journey in the fashion world and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I knew from a very young age that fashion would be a huge part of my life. I was always very creative, whether it be sketching clothes, writing stories, drawing, or painting.

Growing up I was a little quirky, or they say the black sheep in the family. But looking back at some of the clothes I was wearing then as an 8- 10 yr old, I could say I was ahead of my time?

All my clothes consisted of me designing them and then spending the weekend sewing with my mother. There were some questionable designs in the early stages! (laughs)

The time spent with my mother learning how to make patterns and going to fabric stores was such a favourite pastime.

That period of my life was a very special time with my mother and our love for making clothes created such a close bond. One I still remember 40 years later.

That’s what I love about fashion! The connection that it can create between people!

What do you like most about being a designer?

Freedom. That there is no right or wrong when it comes to being a designer. Fashion and Art are individual interpretations.

Designing has always given me creative freedom, and I can’t imagine my life without having this creative space available to me.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

Aside from the pressure and high expectations we put on ourselves, there really isn’t a great deal to say negatively about being a fashion designer.

I feel very privileged and fortunate to do what I love most. I think a lot of designers would agree with that.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

There are a few memorable moments to recall, but the one I have the fondest memory of would have to be showing at New York Fashion Week 2016.

This was a wonderful experience, purely because I had to push myself to a new level of pressure to make it happen. It was an extremely tight deadline, having just come off Australian Bridal Fashion Week. Trying to put together a NEW collection and coordinating a team, all within 5 weeks was a lot of work, to say the least.

It was a challenging time, but we did it! The value of having my husband, my sister, and close friends by my side right to the end was so important and unforgettable.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

A celebrity would be a cliche to name, but for me, I feel this would have to be some of the clients I have been lucky enough to have met and have created a bond with.

All the women over the years that I have had the pleasure of working closely with and designing gowns for, have taught me a lot.

Sometimes as designers, we don’t give ourselves enough credit, and I have found that through my wonderful clients, they have shown me such immense appreciation for the work that is achieved.

Working as a designer especially when designing brides their dream wedding gowns, we help bring to life their vision.

The joy I get to see amongst their families, and all the interesting stories that are shared is what I value most.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

Evolve with the industry, otherwise, you will be left behind! Grow as a business, and move with the times.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Yes. Extremely supportive. It has been detrimental to my career having their support and knowing they have been behind me 100% (especially my husband).

I definitely could not have done it alone.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

The advice I would tell my younger self is that it is okay to make mistakes, as long as you learn from them. And learn from them quickly!

When I started my fashion label (2004), I wanted to do it all. I worked in the business, rather than on the business.

I finally realised one person can not do everything, especially if you want to grow. Learn to have the right people in the places to help grow your business.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

In any business, learn to delegate to free up your time so that you can use your expertise skills the best way possible!

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

In the current conditions with Covid, we have shifted the LUOM.O brand to meet the demands of the preferred choice of online shopping.

Before all this, our brand had such a strong custom-design clientele, where clients would come in for 4-5 fittings. This area of designing is barely a thing now.

We have re-focused on how to provide for our customers by creating a strong online presence.

Most importantly we continue to support our customers in many ways by making sure the customer service level is high and does not differ from whether you shop online to shopping personally in-store.

We look forward to having those one-on-one experiences and creating some custom masterpieces in the near future!

Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Yeaji Lee

Yeaji Lee is a 22-year-old fashion designer based in South Korea. She started her design adventure quite early; When she was eight years old, She was a gifted art student through the 20-1 competition rate at the Seoul Arts Center’s Art Gifted Academy.

When she was 12, she only prepared for four months and got into the most famous art middle school in Korea called Yewon School. And then, when she was 15, She entered Seoul Arts High School, Korea’s highest private art high school, in third place. During high school, she used to rank first and second in a major in design. Currently, she entered the Department of Fashion Design at Ewha Woman’s University and is taking a leave of absence. During her leave of absence, she worked as an intern in Münn Seoul, a high fashion brand in South Korea, for three months. After that month, she is preparing for her brand; the name is “it’s Yeah.”

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Yeaji to discuss her journey in the fashion world and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I got into the fashion industry when I was 20, only a few days after entering Ewha Women’s University. Until I was 19, I wanted to be a visual or space complex designer, and fashion never crossed my mind. So I never thought to get into this. But I didn’t get accepted into the department of design at the university I wanted. So I applied unintentionally to the fashion design department with my parents’ persuasion, and then I got in.
I was very depressed to go to the fashion design department first time. But there’s a twist! When I was in college, a few days later, my senior called me to help her at a major fashion event.
I became a helper for various brands during Seoul Fashion Week which was held in a huge complex Design Space, made up of fashion shows, visuals, music, and models. It was the perfect way to express all of the designs. The excitement of being part of such a world made me interested in fashion and now I’ve got my heart set on the fashion industry.

What do you like most about being a designer?

From the stage of coming up with creative ideas to the design process and the results, the whole design process is the most attractive thing to being a designer.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

The disadvantage of fashion designers is that the first starting point in the fashion industry is mostly passionate about pay and exploitation. These things are taken for granted. Also, I think it is not easy to grow into a fashion designer in South Korea. I hope there is strong support for designers in other countries.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

My most memorable experience was when the Louis Vuitton Cruise 2020 Fashion Show was held at the hangar of Incheon International Airport, South Korea, and I was contacted. I thought it was really a dream. Can a high-profile fashion brand really contact me who was just a helper without any connection?? Fashion and I are meant to be! As a result, on October 31, 2019, it was an opportunity to see and talk to the people behind a top fashion brand. Louis Vuitton’s employees, stylists, and local top models, as well as Louis Vuitton’s exclusive models. The scale of the fashion show and the production of the video were incredible – and I was only 20 years old so it was my most memorable experience and I’m grateful to them.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

Currently, the most interesting and respected person I have met is Han Hyun-min, a creative director in Munn Seoul. He is a leader in our country’s fashion world. It is the first Korean brand to enter Milan and London Fashion Week and is recognized abroad. Before he majored in fashion design, he majored in graphic and photography design, and I also studied visual graphic design before majoring in fashion. I’m making him a role model because his life, style, etc. are my favorite directions and feelings. I’m currently working for his brand and I’m very happy to work for it.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or yourself.

In Korea, I took gifted art classes at the Seoul Arts Center when I was in elementary school, and went to Yewon Scool when I was in middle, and hen went to Seoul Arts High School when I was in high school, getting advice and valuable classes from excellent teachers and friends. It’s really hard to choose just one. But if I can choose the most valuable lesson, It might be a lesson my parents told me. They always said “do your best in everything if you want to succeed” and “invest generously in your major.” THIS would have been the most intense advice and help in my design life.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

My parents are fully supportive. They always helped me if things are related to my major. Without support, I would not have grown this much.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

If I go back to the past, I think I will continue to walk this path and I would have a more external experience like exhibitions, performances, and trips, not textbook studies. Oh, there’s an anecdote I remember. It was April when I was in my first year of high school. My family was supposed to travel to Dubai for a week. My parents told me to give up studying for the exam and go on a trip, but I disagreed. I said to them” I can’t go! I have to study. The midterms are important. This midterms grade is related to the university I wanted so I must study, and not travel around.” Except for me, my family went on a trip and had a great time (laughs), I didn’t go on the trip so I should get a good grade right? Nope! I didn’t do well on the test. Screwed up and had no sexual impact on going to college (laughs), I think I should have had more valuable experience since I was young and not studying school textbooks all the time.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

Best advice, “You’ll be good at whatever you do. I’m always rooting for you.”

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I don’t want to succeed as a fashion designer. I’m very interested in directing that encompasses vision, hearing, and spatial. Right now, I took a year off from University. I want to work under the creative director Han Hyun-min, who I mentioned above, to improve my social experience and skills. I have a dream of making a personal high-profile brand or becoming a high-profile brand like Dior, McQueen-style creative director.

I want to be a career woman who is superb in the world.

Emerging Fashion Designer Of The Week: Introducing The Talented Celeste Tran

Celeste is a 20-year-old fashion designer who’s currently a student in the Bachelors of Design program at FIDM in Los Angeles. She started designing relatively early all the way back to high school and she comes from a legacy of people in the fashion industry – she felt like it was part of her DNA. She’s currently doing her best to put her work out there and she’s hoping to grow her brand.

Sassy & Co Magazine recently caught up with Celeste to discuss her journey in the fashion world and here’s what went down:

How did you get into the fashion industry?

I was fresh out of high school with no idea what I wanted to do. I attended community college for a year and suddenly decided- “I’m going to fashion school!” I’d always loved fashion and I had thought at the time- why not? I have time… and it was the best decision of my life.

What do you like most about being a designer?

I think the best part about being a designer is that once you get past caring about the judgment of other people-it is freeing. The ideas in your head are yours and yours alone and when you choose to share them with the world-its really special. I love to see these ideas come to life.

Downside to being a fashion designer?

I think one of the downsides to being a designer is the constant comparison I have in my own head to my peers. I see the potential and already existing beauty and revolutionary new designs and I think what I do isn’t good enough. It’s a huge mental hurdle because we live in a digital world constantly exposed to the best and most exciting parts of everyone else’s lives. It is hard not to be intimidated when I’m just trying to find my own little corner of the world.

What has been the most memorable experience of being in the fashion industry so far?

So far, as of this article, it would have to be the SHEIN X program. I applied really early on to be part of it and it was amazing. On the other hand, I’ve worked for and with amazing designers and I would never trade those experiences for the world.

Who have been the most interesting people you’ve met so far?

I think the most interesting person I’ve met is Denise Focil, I worked for her company as an intern and it was amazing. She took on a mentor role for me and allowed me a chance to design for her even though I had just started fashion school and I knew nothing.

What has been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned while in the fashion industry. This can be about the industry or about yourself.

A lot of my friends would probably say that working for free is something you should never do-I don’t agree. I happen to think that it’s a beneficial experience because it teaches you hard work without expecting anything. It teaches you to treat all opportunities like gold. The most valuable experiences that help you grow are the ones that you don’t pay for.

Is your family supportive of you being a fashion designer?

Yeah, I mentioned above that I come from a legacy of fashion people. My great grandfather ran a clothing factory when he was alive, and my grandmother is a professional tailor working with high-end brands. My family has always supported my dreams.

If you could go back in a time machine to the time when you were just getting started, what would you do differently?

I probably would not change anything. I think I’m lucky to have had the experiences I’ve had even though it might not seem like much-I’m very grateful.

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

Trust the process. I’ve always been about that and I think some things in life you don’t need to question too hard.

What are your future plans? Inside your career or out of it.

I will be showing a runway collection at FMC’s LA Fashion Week on October 19th. It’s going to be great.

How To Choose The Perfect Little Black Dress For Every Occasion

By Chi de Jesus

This item is uber essential that it deserves its own article. The little black dress, chicly known as the “LBD”. It’s little because it’s streamlined and advocates simplicity. It’s black because it’s elegant and yet accessible, mysterious and yet powerful. It’s a dress because it celebrates the female form and delicate nature. Everyone would always refer to the LBD made famous by international fashion icon Audrey Hepburn in her 1960’s movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” but the LBD came much earlier – 1926 to be exact when fashion innovator Coco Chanel published a photo of a short, simple black dress on American Vogue dubbed “Chanel’s Ford.”

However, it’s not a maxi dress or a one-size-fits-all kinda item. It’s the concept of simplicity, elegance, mystery and accessibility that has shaped this fashion item from an “essential” to a “must-have” or even a “should-have.” So how do you now choose the best LBD fit for you?

Follow these steps and come out fabulous.

STEP 1: CHOOSE THE RIGHT CUT

This will mainly depend on your understanding of your body. Know if you are top heavy or bottom heavy – to know if you would need an empire cut or pencil cut, mermaid or flowy even asymmetric. Then work on the concept of highlighting your assets. This will give you an idea of what you would have to consider when it comes to the length of sleeves, depth of neckline, and the type of skirt.

STEP 2: LENGTH OF THE DRESS

The term “little” might have been used loosely since the LBD may come in different lengths – case in point, Audrey’s Givenchy. It may be daunting but you have to face the mirror once again and understand your proportions. If you have a longer torso and shorter legs, having a long dress might not be an option. The same goes if you are not so tall.

STEP 3: CHOOSING THE RIGHT FABRIC

I do understand the term “suffering for fashion” but if the decision is solely up to you, comfort may be the best way to go. Given your country’s climate and the possibility of using more in certain seasons, you might need to choose a versatile fabric that can not only give you comfort but also the functionality.

STEP 4: FINALISING THE DESIGN

Remember that one of the key elements of having a little black dress is its simplicity and elegance. A streamlined design will work to your advantage as it will complement you and not overwhelm your look. If you are thinking of an accent, choose one element of the dress with the same concept – a belt, translucent sleeves, an off-centre flowing fabric, or even a laser-cut detail near the face.

Always remember the rule of thumb – if it doesn’t highlight who you are, it may not be the right dress for you. People would want to see you and not just your dress. When you find that LBD meant for you, it might just be the best thing you’ve ever worn.

Source: The Australian Filipina

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels